Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

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Jun
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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by Jun »

windwalker wrote:
Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:40 pm
I believe he was terminated one month ago.
https://onemileatatime.com/boeing-fires ... airplanes/
The guy fired was just CEO of their commercial airplanes division, not the entire company.

The CEO of the entire Boeing company is Dennis Muilenburg & as far as I know he remains in position. For now.

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by firecat69 »

Looks like it could be quite a bit longer. FAA screwed up originally and now they will not be rushed. How the FAA goes will determine what other countries do in regards to certification.

https://www.bing.com/news/search?q=Boei ... &FORM=EWRE

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

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Former Boeing manager says he warned company of problems prior to 737 crashes

"For the first time in my life, I’m sorry to say that I’m hesitant about putting my family on a Boeing airplane," Ed Pierson wrote to a company executive before the first tragedy.

By Cynthia McFadden, Anna Schecter, Kevin Monahan and Rich Schapiro

Dec. 10, 2019

Speaking out for the first time, a former Boeing manager says he warned the company about problems at its main factory in Washington state in the months before two of its 737 Max airplanes crashed in separate incidents that claimed the lives of nearly 350 people.

The manager, Ed Pierson, spoke to NBC News in an exclusive television interview two days before he’s set to appear before Congress to detail his efforts to sound the alarm over the conditions at the Boeing plant in Renton, where he says a push to increase production of the 737 Max planes created a "factory in chaos."

From the summer of 2018 to the spring of 2019, Pierson implored Boeing executives and then the FAA and NTSB to look into the conditions at the plant in Washington, according to emails obtained by NBC News.

“Frankly right now all my internal warning bells are going off,” Pierson said in an email to Scott Campbell, the general manager of the 737 Max program, on June 9, 2018. "And for the first time in my life, I’m sorry to say that I’m hesitant about putting my family on a Boeing airplane."

Full story: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/fo ... 7-n1098536

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by firecat69 »

When will this plane fly again. A great company that not only didn't get it right initially , but apparently has no date when they will get it right.
Just unbelievable!!

https://www.bizjournals.com/wichita/new ... 7-max.html

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by Jun »

Well, if the TV documentary I saw is correct, the manual override is barely workable, due to excessive manual pilot force needed to overcome aero forces after more than 4 seconds.
Fixing that would not be as easy as the original issue.

Contrary to some earlier predictions, this is far from over. Also, if Boeing were expecting an early approval in 2020, there is no way they would stop production.

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

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Finally they fired the CEO. And there should be lots more executives fired. A great company not well served by executives collecting 100's of millions dollars. They will soon get sued by all the airlines who paid enormous down payments and are losing money every month using old airplanes .

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/boeing-c ... 25446.html

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by Gaybutton »

I don't know about anyone else, but before I would even think about flying on a 737 Max8 all of them will have to be in service and flying for a minimum of two years without any mishaps at all. Even then, I would still be a little nervous if I find myself boarding one.

As far as I'm concerned, this is the biggest aviation fuck-up since the de Havilland Comet.
____________________________________________________________________________

Satellite Photos Of Hundreds Of Undelivered 737 MAX Aircraft Underscore How Much Work Boeing Has Ahead

by Jeremy Bogaisky
Forbes Staff
Aerospace & Defense
Deputy editor for Industry; eyes on the skies

David Calhoun will have a long to-do list when he takes over as CEO of Boeing next month, starting with winning approval from aviation regulators for changes to the 737 MAX’s flight control system to allow the company’s bestselling plane to return to service. Following that, Boeing will face the complex task of retrofitting roughly 400 aircraft it has produced since the 737 MAX was grounded in March in the wake of two deadly crashes, as well as reversing steps taken to preserve the planes while they were idled.

Then there are the 387 aircraft that were already in service with customers that Boeing will have to help restore to working condition.

The enormity of the work that lies ahead is reinforced by satellite photos from Planet Labs of locations where Boeing is storing undelivered aircraft.

Boeing is marshaling the lion’s share of the planes at its test facility at Moses Lake near Seattle, seen below on Dec. 8.

(Photos: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremyboga ... 19ee794511 )

There were 249 aircraft parked at Moses Lake as of Thursday, a few dozen aircraft away from the airfield’s capacity, says Michel Merluzeau, a Seattle-based director of aerospace and defense market analysis with the consultancy AIR. Most are on the pad in the southwest corner of the picture, which Boeing began parking planes on in October, he says.

That’s up from sharply from 40 in July, when, to illustrate the buildup of undelivered planes since March, Forbes published the series of time-lapse photos below from Planet Labs, a San Francisco-based company with a network of about 140 small satellites that take over a million images of the Earth a day:

Moses Lake is a short flight from the delivery center at Boeing Field and the company’s factory complex in Everett, Washington, the two locations where the bulk of the return to service work is expected be done.

Boeing has been storing roughly 60 planes at Boeing Field since at least July, with some 737 MAXs occupying employee parking spaces.

Boeing’s maintenance center in San Antonio, which will also prepare 737 MAX aircraft to return to service, is hosting 74 planes, also little-changed from July, but the company has moved more to a northern section of Kelly Field, seen below, away from its facilities.

Some 19 planes were outside its hangars at the southern end of the former military base as of Dec. 15.

The aircraft at Boeing Field and San Antonio will be the first to be delivered, says Merluzeau.

Beyond updating the planes’ flight control software, Boeing’s task is made more complex by the varying amounts of time different aircraft have been sitting. The longer they’ve been parked, the more that may have to be done to restore them to flying condition.

To make its job easier, Boeing could group aircraft together that need the same work packages, says Merluzeau.

Southwest Airlines said earlier this year that it expects it will take 120 hours of work on each of its 34 grounded 737 MAX planes to get them ready to fly again, and 30 to 60 days for the airline’s whole fleet.

To get the work done, Boeing will be able to draw at least initially on the 12,000 workers at the 737 plant in Renton, which will be idled at the beginning of January. Aerospace analyst Ronald Epstein of Bank of America/Merrill Lynch believes Boeing won’t restart production until two months after the global average return to service date.

However, two other bottlenecks loom for Boeing. The FAA has decided it will inspect and certify all of Boeing’s planes that are coming out of storage before they are delivered, a task it had previously delegated to Boeing. That could slow down the process.

Airlines also may not have the capability to inspect and take delivery of large quantities of 737 MAX aircraft quickly – and in some cases they may not want to if travel growth continues to slow.

Southwest Airlines was expecting delivery of 41 planes by the end of this year and American Airlines was expecting 16.

It could take 15 months for Boeing to clear out all the stored aircraft, Merluzeau estimates, during which time it will also have to integrate new aircraft into the delivery flow once the Renton factory restarts production.

When Boeing can get started depends on when the FAA ungrounds the plane. FAA Administrator Stephen Dickson earlier this month punctured Boeing’s hopes that the regulator could finish its evaluations before the end of the year, telling a congressional panel that nearly a dozen milestones remained to be completed. Some observers think a decision could come by late February or early March.

United Airlines on Friday said it was scrubbing its 737 MAX aircraft from its flight schedule until June 4.

Story and photos: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremyboga ... 19ee794511

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by firecat69 »

There is plenty of blame to go around .. For my 2 cents the FAA under the worst President ever is equally responsible. Trump put Mitches wife in as Sec. Transportation and naturally it would follow the FAA would decline and of course it has. Probably lucky there have not been more incidents as almost every portion of the US Government is in decline.

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by Jun »

The approval of the 737 max would have preceeded the Trump presidency. That's where the first huge error was made. There is no way that a system which can cause a plane to crash when one sensor fails should ever pass an FMEA review. It's gross negligence.

As for avoiding planes during the first 2-5 years in service, I think this is wise. Any aircraft for Air Force 1 have to have had 5 years service before being deemed suitable for the president. That tells me all I need to know.

However, if 737 max aircraft get shipped in huge numbers, it will be quite difficult to avoid them, unless ruling out every airline that has one. If an airline has 200 737s and 10 of them were max models, then once back in service, how do I know which routes get the max ?

For example, I once researched a particular route, noted no crashes by the airline for a couple of decades and that they run ATRs on this route (turboprop). All OK. Then when walking across the tarmac, I see the plane is an AVIC (Chinese).

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Re: Boeing 737 Max8 Crashes

Post by firecat69 »

Jun wrote:
Thu Dec 26, 2019 12:32 pm
The approval of the 737 max would have preceeded the Trump presidency. That's where the first huge error was made. There is no way that a system which can cause a plane to crash when one sensor fails should ever pass an FMEA review. It's gross negligence.
Sorry, but you are sort of right. Certification and the first commercial flight did not take place until May 2017. That is 5 months into the Trump Administration. Having worked in the FAA, I am well aware that changes in Administrations and the expertise of nominees put in charge can change the way things are approved. There is plenty of blame to go around here and the Airlines certainly are not without blame for not realizing that live training was needed for this airplane.

The following article is the best I have seen for tracing the history of the Max.

https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing- ... ils-2019-9

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