What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Dodger
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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Well, it didn't take long.

The legal bloodhounds in Manhattan are hot on the scoundrel's ass as expected.

My nickel bet is that he ends up tossing his robot son Donald Jr. under the bus before this is over.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/legal-pressu ... 29027.html

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Dodger wrote:
Sun Jan 31, 2021 12:32 pm
Well, it didn't take long.
And on top of that, Trump's entire impeachment defense team has quit on him - with less than two weeks to go before his impeachment trial - and so far he can't find a lawyer willing to represent him. Maybe Trump will have to rely on a fresh out of law school public defender or find a lawyer at Clem's Septic Tank Service and Law Office . . .

Also, let's not forget Rudy Giuliani. Remember that old adage, "A lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client"? He is facing possible disbarment, and yet he says he is going to represent himself. Not much doubt Giuliani is a fool. I have to wonder whether that is the reason why he is going to represent himself or if he too can't find a lawyer willing to take his case.

Between Trump and Giuliani, it's Giuliani who I don't get. Trump apparently has been the way he is his entire life, but after 9/11 Giuliani was considered a national hero and was dubbed "America's Mayor". And he threw it all away for Trump, who now won't even pay him. If I could ask Giuliani just one question, that question would be just one word - Why?

"For Wales. Why Richard, it profits a man nothing to give his soul for the whole world. But for Wales?"
- Paul Scofield (Thomas More), 'A Man for All Seasons'

But for Trump?
_________________________________________________________________

Trump's impeachment defense team leaves less than two weeks before trial

By Gloria Borger, Kaitlan Collins, Jeff Zeleny and Ashley Semler, CNN

January 31, 2021

(CNN) - Former President Donald Trump's five impeachment defense attorneys have left a little more than a week before his trial is set to begin, according to people familiar with the case, amid a disagreement over his legal strategy.

It was a dramatic development in the second impeachment trial for Trump, who has struggled to find lawyers willing to take his case. And now, with legal briefs due next week and a trial set to begin only days later, Trump is clinging to his election fraud charade and suddenly finds himself without legal representation.

Butch Bowers and Deborah Barbier, who were expected to be two of the lead attorneys, are no longer on the team. A source familiar with the changes said it was a mutual decision for both to leave the legal team. As the lead attorney, Bowers assembled the team.

Josh Howard, a North Carolina attorney who was recently added to the team, has also left, according to another source familiar with the changes. Johnny Gasser and Greg Harris, from South Carolina, are no longer involved with the case, either.

No other attorneys have announced they are working on Trump's impeachment defense.

A person familiar with the departures told CNN that Trump wanted the attorneys to argue there was mass election fraud and that the election was stolen from him rather than focus on the legality of convicting a president after he's left office. Trump was not receptive to the discussions about how they should proceed in that regard.

The attorneys had not yet been paid any advance fees and a letter of intent was never signed.

CNN has reached out to the attorneys for comment.

"The Democrats' efforts to impeach a president who has already left office is totally unconstitutional and so bad for our country. In fact, 45 Senators have already voted that it is unconstitutional. We have done much work, but have not made a final decision on our legal team, which will be made shortly," former Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller told CNN.

Bowers, a respected lawyer from Columbia, South Carolina, once worked in the Justice Department under President George W. Bush.
Barbier, a South Carolina litigator, worked closely on several high-profile cases and was a former federal prosecutor for 15 years in the state before opening up her own boutique criminal defense firm.

Gasser and Harris are both former federal prosecutors. Gasser served as the interim US attorney for South Carolina earlier in his career. Both have worked closely with Barbier on the defense side.

Howard worked as an associate independent counsel on the Whitewater and Monica Lewinsky investigations during the Clinton presidency and spent a decade in the Justice Department where he worked on the confirmations of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito. Howard once served as the chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Elections, leaving the post at the beginning of 2016.

https://us.cnn.com/2021/01/30/politics/ ... index.html

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Gaybutton wrote:
Sun Jan 31, 2021 1:20 pm
Between Trump and Giuliani, it's Giuliani who I don't get.
I think Trump and Giuliani are both cut from the same loaf.

There's a very fine line between the good guys and the bad guys, and both of these idiots have spent their lives dancing on that line. Both are extreme power-seekers who have held positions with responsibilities for upholding the law - and both have violated the very laws they were supposed to be upholding when it served their best interest. Criminal minds think alike as they say.

I guess being the HERO of 9/11 wasn't good enough for someone with Giuliani's warped persona. He immediately had aspirations of being President, and when he couldn't win that nomination, he decided to cling onto Trump's coattail just to be connected at the top. Personally, I don't think Giuliani changed at all since 9/11. I just think we're seeing his true colors now.

The real unfortunate thing about this is, regardless of who represents Trump at the Impeachment hearing, those bastards in the Senate aren't going to convict him, or prohibit him from running for office again. The majority of the House is postured to sell America out. I hate to even envision this happening - but that seems to be the way this thing is headed. The best we can hope for if that does happen, is for criminal prosecutions and convictions in Manhattan and other courts that would drain his already-shrinking pocketbook, and possibly give him some jail time. As far as Giuliani goes, I really think he's burnt toast at this juncture.

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Dodger wrote:
Sun Jan 31, 2021 2:54 pm
Criminal minds think alike as they say.
That includes the senators who know damned well Trump is guilty, but will still kiss his ass. Look who the USA has in positions of power - senators like these. Nut cases like Marjorie Taylor Greene. Congressmen carrying guns on the House floor and some who think the invasion of the Capitol was a patriotic thing to do.

I've already given up on the senate convicting Trump, although I am still hopeful of being pleasantly surprised. However, Trump still faces a barrage of lawsuits and criminal charges, so there is still plenty on the table to go badly for Trump.

I can't even hazard a guess as to how this will all play out for Trump and all these other morons and criminals.

Want me to say it again? How would you like to be a history teacher 50 or 100 years from now trying to explain all this to your class?

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Trump may have been acquitted, as expected - but:

And I think he is going to find himself faced with many more problems than appear in the article.
_______________________________________________________

This is Trump's heaping list of legal problems post-impeachment

By Kara Scannell, Sonia Moghe and Jason Morris, CNN

February 13, 2021

(CNN) - After averting a conviction in his second impeachment trial, former President Donald Trump faces significant new legal threats as prosecutors in Georgia have joined those in New York to conduct criminal investigations into his actions.

As the nation watched harrowing videos from January 6 of Trump supporters storming the US Capitol during the Senate impeachment trial this week, Georgia officials announced they have opened investigations into Trump's efforts to overturn the state's election results, including by pressuring officials to "find" votes to swing the outcome in his favor.

The new investigations add to a heaping list of legal issues facing the former President that could threaten his finances and possibly his freedom.
Out of office and without the protections that the presidency afforded him, Trump is now facing multiple criminal investigations, civil state inquiries and defamation lawsuits by two women accusing him of sexual assault.

The pressure comes as Trump weighs his future in politics and in business with the Trump Organization, which has already been impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, also losing corporate partnerships following Trump's January 6 speech whipping up the crowd.

In the three weeks since Trump left the White House, the multiple legal threats he faces have increased and become more imminent.

Georgia election results

Georgia officials announced that the former President faces two new investigations over calls he made to election officials in an attempt to overturn the state's election results.

A source familiar with the Georgia secretary of state's investigation confirmed they are investigating two calls, including one Trump made to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger.

In the January call, audio of which was obtained by CNN, Trump is heard pushing Raffensperger to "find" votes to overturn the election results after his loss to then-President-elect Joe Biden.

"This is not an easy case, but it's not one that you should walk away from investigating," said Bret Williams, a former federal prosecutor in New York and Atlanta. "It will be tough to show that he had intent to solicit Raffensperger to commit election fraud but he may have."
Trump's senior adviser, Jason Miller, said in a statement to CNN that there was nothing "improper or untoward" about the scheduled call between Trump and Raffensperger.

"If Mr. Raffensperger didn't want to receive calls about the election, he shouldn't have run for secretary of state," Miller said in the statement.

The investigation also involves a call Trump made in December to a Georgia election investigator in the state secretary of state's office who was leading a probe into allegations of ballot fraud in Cobb County. Trump is heard asking the investigator to "find the fraud," saying the official would be a "national hero."

The second Georgia investigation is being conducted by the Fulton County District Attorney's office, which announced Wednesday that it has also opened a criminal investigation into Trump for his "attempts to influence the administration of the 2020 Georgia general election."

"Anyone that violates the law will be prosecuted, no matter what their social stature is, no matter what their economics are, no matter what their race is or their gender. We're not going to treat anyone differently," Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis told CNN affiliate WSB in an interview earlier this week.

The earliest a Fulton County grand jury is expected to convene is in March, and the district attorney's office can request grand jury subpoenas as necessary at that time.

"I believe laws were broken because I think it was a clear effort by at the time a President of the United States, who I think at the time also wielded a certain amount of power to influence the secretary of state to do something wrong," said Michael J. Moore, a former US Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia during the Obama administration.

"I think that's what the statute says, and if those things happened, that's a violation of law," he said.

Business dealings in New York

Trump also faces a criminal investigation in New York where the Manhattan District Attorney's office is looking into whether the Trump Organization violated state laws, such as insurance fraud, tax fraud or other schemes to defraud. The scope of the investigation is broad, with prosecutors looking into, among other things, whether the Trump Organization misled financial institutions when applying for loans or violated tax laws when donating a conservation easement on its estate called Seven Springs and taking deductions on fees paid to consultants.

Prosecutors are awaiting a decision from the US Supreme Court on whether it will continue to delay the enforcement of a subpoena for eight years of Trump's personal and business tax returns and related records from his accounting firm.

If the Supreme Court allows the subpoena to be enforced, it will provide a significant boost to the investigation.

New York State Attorney General Letitia James' office is conducting a civil investigation into whether the Trump Organization inflated the values of his assets in order to secure favorable loans and insurance coverage.

Alan Garten, general counsel of the Trump Organization, previously told the New York Times, "Everything was done in strict compliance with applicable law and under the advice of counsel and tax experts." He added, "All applicable taxes were paid and no party received any undue benefit."

The attorney general's office deposed Eric Trump, executive vice president of the Trump Organization, in October. James' investigation is civil at this time but could become criminal.

The insurrection in Washington, DC

In Washington, federal prosecutors investigating the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol have signaled that no one is above the law, including Trump, and have stressed that nothing is off the table when asked if they were looking at the former President's role in inciting violence.

In the flurry of court proceedings after more than 200 people were charged with federal crimes, Trump's influence on rioters has been mentioned both by prosecution and defendants looking to defray responsibility.

In a case filed Thursday against a member of the Oath Keepers, prosecutors alleged the woman was awaiting direction from Trump, which is the first time they have made that direct of an allegation.

DC's Attorney General Karl Racine also warned that Trump could face criminal charges in the days after insurrection, saying DC laws prohibit statements that "clearly encourage, cajole and... get people motivated to commit violence," he told MSNBC in January.

Racine said in the interview that his office, which enforces local codes for the city, is collaborating with federal prosecutors on the case.

Freed from protection by the presidency

No longer in office, Trump cannot rely on several defenses that he did while President.

"Things are going to speed up. He doesn't have the excuse of being the sitting President anymore," said Jennifer Rodgers, a former federal prosecutor and CNN legal analyst. "I do think the people that expect that we're going to see serious action in the civil suits sooner are going to be disappointed because civil litigation just moves so slowly anyway."

But, Rodgers added, there's no reason to delay those civil suits anymore now that he's out of office.

Those suits include one by Racine's office, which alleges the Trump Organization and Presidential Inaugural Committee abused more than $1 million in inauguration funds by "grossly overpaying" to use event space at Trump's Washington, DC, hotel for his inauguration in 2017.

Ivanka Trump sat for a deposition in the case in December, tweeting afterward a screen grab of an email which she says shows her asking the hotel to charge "a fair market rate." Investigators also asked Donald Trump, Jr. to sit for an interview.

"This 'inquiry' is another politically motivated demonstration of vindictiveness & waste of taxpayer dollars," Ivanka Trump said in her December tweet.

Trump has also been facing defamation lawsuits that were largely delayed while he was in office.

One was filed by E. Jean Carroll, a former magazine columnist who accused him of rape, and another by Summer Zervos, a former contestant on "The Apprentice" who claims the President sexually assaulted her in 2007. Both women say he defamed them by saying their claims were lies.

Carroll is seeking to depose Trump and obtain a swab of his DNA. The case was moving forward until the Justice Department under Trump attempted to intervene in the case.

A federal judge denied the effort, and lawyers for Trump and the Justice Department appealed the ruling. It is not clear if the Biden administration will continue the appeal.

The Zervos lawsuit, which was filed in 2017, has been on hold since last year. Trump's lawyers had argued the US Constitution barred a sitting president from being sued in state court.

Last week, Zervos' lawyers filed a motion asking the appeals court to dismiss the appeal "as moot" and allow the lawsuit to move forward.
Trump has denied wrongdoing in both lawsuits.

One legal issue that hits closer to home is whether Trump will be able to continue living full time at Mar-a-Lago
.
Neighbors of the Palm Beach resort have argued that Trump breached an agreement with the town by moving in full time last month. Town zoning laws allow him to live there full time if he is considered a "bona fide employee" of the club.

"There is no prohibition in there about the owner using the owner's suite," attorney John Marion said. "This guy (Trump), as he wanders the property, is like the mayor of Mar-a-Lago, if you will."

After a meeting on Tuesday, the town council made no decision, but it is expected to review the matter in the spring.

https://us.cnn.com/2021/02/13/politics/ ... index.html

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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NY Prosecutors have given Trump's lawyers until Monday to shit or get off the pot.

Criminal charges appear to be imminent, and Manhattan's Cyrus Vance is going for Trump's jugular vein.

Experts say that a conviction could throw the Trump Organization into bankruptcy.

If convicted, Trump's odds of winning the nomination for another term as President would be the same as Randy Rainbow getting elected as Secretary of State. On second thought, Randy would stand a better chance... :lol:

Story here:

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/ny-p ... 01315.html

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Re: What becomes of Trump once he leaves office?

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Remember "The Never Ending Story"? Why does this article remind me of it?
_______________________________________________________________

Yes, Donald Trump's final days in office were even worse than we thought

Analysis by Chris Cillizza, CNN Editor-at-large

July 13, 2021

(CNN) - Donald Trump's final days as president were defined by near-total chaos as House Democrats moved to impeach him for his action (and inaction) during the January 6 riot at the US Capitol even as the soon-to-be-former president sought to use the power of his office to settle scores and reward loyalists.

And yet, even amid those last, wild days, there was a sense that for as bad as everything we could see was, there was even worse stuff going on behind closed doors that wouldn't be made public until Trump left office, and the true reportorial digging began.

Which brings me to Tuesday, when two highly anticipated Trump books -- Michael Bender's "Frankly We Did Win This Election," and Michael Wolff's "Landslide" -- went on sale, with a third book -- "I Alone Can Fix It" by Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker -- scheduled to be released in seven days' time.

All three books focus on Trump's last year in office. And all three present what can only be described as a terrifying picture of a president consumed by personal hatred and unwilling to even consider the limits his predecessors had placed on themselves in office.

The stories that have already emerged paint a scary picture. Trump calling for the execution of whoever leaked that he had been taken to the White House bunker while Black Lives Matter protesters were marching through the streets of Washington in the wake of the murder of George Floyd in May 2020. His volcanic reaction when Arizona was called for Joe Biden on election night. Trump raging at then-Attorney General Bill Barr about (nonexistent) voter fraud.

A shouting match between Trump and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley over the appropriate response to the BLM protests engulfing the country in the summer of 2020.

There are more stories that have emerged from these books. And there will be even more once readers -- and reporters -- get their hands on the hard copies and are able to do their own digging into Trump's final days.

But these stories also present a problem: Each one is, yes, appalling. But the nature of our news cycle is such that even as I was writing this piece, I was struggling to remember the individual stories that had already come out of the books.

The stories that come out of these books -- released to gin up excitement and, more importantly, sales in advance of their releases -- tend to be fleeting, shining bright for a brief moment when the political universe is all staring at them but quickly disappearing into the vastness of our broader news consumption.

That fact is why it's important not to get too caught up in any one revelation that has or will emerge from these books and instead take a step back and see the broader reality being painted here.

And that reality is this:

* Faced with a once-in-a-century public health crisis, Donald Trump not only drastically mishandled some of the basics (rapid testing for Covid-19, mask-wearing) but also actively worked to undermine public confidence in the very doctors, epidemiologists and public health experts who were working to keep Americans safe.

* Unable to accept that he had lost the election, Trump sought to use the official powers of the government -- including the Justice Department -- to try to find non-existent evidence of fraud. He created an environment in which a large chunk of Americans believed this Big Lie about the election and then not only incited the January 6 crowd but also stood by for hours as they ransacked the Capitol.

* Trump, who repeatedly told crowds during the campaign that he had done more for Black people than any president since Abraham Lincoln, failed to grasp either the gravity or the goals of the Black Lives Matter protests. He saw the racial justice protests as nothing more than an uprising against HIM -- and tried to force the military to deploy to states where the marches were most prevalent.

This is, in sum, a man deeply unfit for the presidency. (That is not a partisan statement. It is a statement of fact based on the clear portrait we have of how Trump behaved while in the most powerful office in the country.) A man who, by his inability to understand the sanctity of the office he held, threatened to destroy that sanctity for those who would follow him into the White House. And a man who was, without any question, an active danger for every single American -- whether they supported or opposed him.

THAT needs to be the takeaway from these books. THAT is the forest through the trees. And THAT is the truth that voters needs to hear if and when Trump tries to reclaim the presidency in 2024.

https://us.cnn.com/2021/07/13/politics/ ... index.html

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