By Barry Kenyon

Anything and everything about Thailand
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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Gaybutton wrote:
Wed Jun 08, 2022 6:08 pm
"If you want love in Thailand, rent it." - Richard Burk - former owner of the Amor Restaurant in Boyztown
The other saying is "If it flies, floats or fornicates, rent it". [That's the version with the polite wording].

It's all very easy for me as long as my latest trade obligingly leaves after short time or long time and doesn't come up with any additional requests for money. Which is mostly the case. Requests for money are rare and even those who have asked have been those who I had already decided not to see again, based on quality of service factors. Now if a lad has only done short time with me and he's not particularly good at his job, it's not my responsibility to provide financial aid to compensate for his lack of application.

I guess it's more of a test if a lad starts asking for money in a long term relationship.

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Jun wrote:
Wed Jun 08, 2022 7:58 pm
It's all very easy for me as long as my latest trade obligingly leaves after short time or long time and doesn't come up with any additional requests for money.
For me it depends on why he wants the money, how much he asks for, and whether I can easily afford it - emphasis on easily.

The problem all too often is when a farang helps a boy once, that is the start of the never-ending pleas for money. No matter how much and how often you give him money, it's never enough. Eventually either the farang has to end the relationship (if it ever truly was a relationship) or end up like the farang in my post above. Far too many farang learn the hard way.

When I hear a farang say, "Not this boy. He's different." - that's when I know I'm talking to someone already headed down the slippery slope to absolute disaster.

It can be very difficult because the hardship stories are usually plausible and quite often true - but as you said, having sex on occasion does not make you responsible for someone else's life.


"When the piles of gold start to grow, that's when the trouble starts."
- Walter Huston (Howard), 'The Treasure of the Sierra Madre'

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Gaybutton wrote:
Wed Jun 08, 2022 8:31 pm
For me it depends on why he wants the money
Then comes the question of how to figure out if the explanation is truthful.

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Jun wrote:
Wed Jun 08, 2022 11:53 pm
Then comes the question of how to figure out if the explanation is truthful.
There are many factors that fit in to it. I don't think you need to hire a detective agency and I don't think there is much point in trying to initiate a third degree interrogation. They have an answer for everything - just like you did when you were a teenager . . .

Part of it is how much experience you've had with these boys. After enough of a long time of it, you get to where you just kind of know. If I think he is giving me bullshit, I tell him sorry, I can't help you.

For me it depends on how long I've known the boy, how well I like him, how much he wants, and if he has asked for money before. If it is a boy I know only casually, such as an off, if he is asking for just a few hundred baht, I really don't care about his sob story. I've heard them all. I usually just give it to him, but make it clear I will help him only this time and if he comes to me for money again, sorry, but the answer will be NO. Sometimes they try again anyway. They know, despite what you said, it can't hurt to try. Maybe they've got "a live one". Maybe the farang will give in to my high pressure pitch. But no matter how difficult it may be, you can't give in.

If you do, you will have fallen into the trap.

"If you do you will be shot!"
- Lotte Lenya (Rosa Klebb), 'From Russia with Love'

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Thai laws are famous for being vague on details
That is for sure - and definitely an understatement. It seems like every time Thailand comes up with new laws, rules, and regulations there is always plenty of confusion. And then when a clarification and/or explanation comes out, the result is even more confusion. Most of the time it's not only farang who are confused. Thais are often just as confused as everybody else.

I think most people reading this are well aware of how often some sort of new regulation comes out, is enforced for a couple weeks, and then duly ignored. If the powers-that-be truly believe now that marijuana use has been legalized, it will be used only for legitimate medical purposes and that people will only grow plants that contain no more than 0.2% THC level, all I can say is good luck enforcing the unenforceable.
_________________________________________________________

Tourists baffled by new Thai laws on cell phones and marijuana use

By Barry Kenyon

June 11, 2022

Thai laws are famous for being vague on details. Nor does enforcement always follow through Thus, prostitution in Thailand has been illegal since 1960 which often comes as a surprise to consenting adults in private or devotees of the back room in massage parlors. However, the latest laws on both personal privacy and the use of cannabis are causing even lawyers to scratch their heads.

The new law on marijuana use and abuse came into force this month, largely designed to allow Thai citizens to grow the plant for medical and agricultural benefits. And to make a profit provided they register. But western tourists have been turning up at the Pattaya tourist office to try and find out if smoking pot is now allowed. They have been told that recreational use is still illegal, but that no action is likely if smoked in “your own home”.

On penalties, the new law specifies a three months jail sentence and/or a fine of 25,000 baht (around US$800) for use of marijuana extracts containing more than 0.2% of THC, the chemical that makes you high. John Lees, a tourist from Manchester, asked if it was safe to smoke pot in your hotel room. Hard to say, but the advice from the Pattaya lawyers association is to steer clear for now. “Questions could be asked by police about where the stuff came from, whilst a party in the room is different from being alone.”

There is also much confusion about the personal data protection act which came into force at the beginning of the month. The main purpose is to protect individuals against commercial exploitation or fraud, but the loopholes and ambiguities are many. Thus a spokesman for the Ministry of Digital Economy and Society warns people, Thai or foreign, not to photograph or film others and then post the material on social media. The actual context was pictures or film of a criminal act, but the wider implications are also a blur.

Already, a middle-aged Thai woman is suing a media outlet (not this one) for publishing a photo of her in a skimpy gogo costume which leaves little to the imagination. She claims the picture caused her embarrassment and discredit. Concerns about the literal meaning of the legislation have even spread to Thai hospitals where some patients are being asked to sign a detailed declaration that the company can hold and use personal data for professional and even marketing purposes.

Lawyers say that it will take time for the new laws to be digestible. The pressures to legalize smoking pot are now well-nigh unstoppable and many commentators believe that cannabis sandboxes (reserved areas) will be the first step within a year. As regards personal data, the police will, in criminal cases, have some discretion which to send to the public prosecutor’s office. Civil cases will take years to resolve in a notoriously slow-moving bureaucracy. To misquote Bette Davis, “Hold on to your hats, this could be a bumpy ride.”

https://www.pattayamail.com/latestnews/ ... use-401105

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Pattaya photoshoot June 2022: Soi Buakhao back bigtime

By Barry Kenyon

June 12, 2022

For this story, click on the link: https://www.pattayamail.com/latestnews/ ... eat-401145

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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The central and northern end of Soi Bukhao was thriving, even 6 months ago.
I even had a few beers there on 12 December, in order to watch the final race of the F1 season (the one rigged by a race director not following the rules).
A small Singha was 65 baht, compared with 80 or 100 in Jomtien. However, the service was by a couple of overweight Thai ladies, probably in their 30s or 40s. So they were not spending any money filling their bar with cute staff and it's therefore not a like for like comparison with Jomtien.

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Thailand’s latest 10 year retirement visa available from September

By Barry Kenyon

June 17, 2022

The Board of Investment has announced a launch date of September 1 for the latest tranche of long-stay resident visas, or LTRs. These are the 10-year permissions available to high-potential individuals such as the globally wealthy, highly-skilled professionals and – significantly – retirees over 50 who are economically inactive. The one-off registration fee is 50,000 baht for all types.

As regards retirees, the LTR is muscling in on a crowded field. There are already O and OA annual visas and extensions of stay in Thai embassies and immigration bureau, the 5-20 year Elite visa and even a 10-year predecessor known as O/X, introduced in 2017 and barely taken up because of its complexities and limited advantages. Retirees married to Thai nationals have their own route too, requiring the foreigner to prove only 400,000 baht annually in savings or income.

The LTR retiree option requires a pension of 80,000 baht a year or, if less, a US$250,000 investment in government bonds or public companies. There is compulsory ongoing insurance of US$50,000 and a minimum age of 50. Earlier announcements claimed that (for all LTRs) there would be no requirement to perform the 90 days reporting ritual and even suggested that voluntary or unpaid work might now be allowed. Ability to buy freehold property from developers was also mooted. These details have never been clarified and still aren’t.

Thai authorities have a gigantic task ahead in persuading well-heeled foreigners to access the LTR. The advantages and bonuses, if any, need to be spelt out in detail. One of the many reasons why the Elite visa got off to a poor start in 2003 was that rumors of holders being able to buy one rai of land or work without a permit proved to be without foundation. The main Elite bonuses appear to be retail discounts and a separate channel at airports and immigration (if you are lucky).

The matter of immediate concern to Thai retirees is the future of insurance requirements – not Covid cover, but the comprehensive type. Already, those holding OA visas from an embassy must possess comprehensive hospital cover when annually extending at immigration. The annual minimum rises to US$100,000 in September according to earlier announcements, with an option for self-insurers too old or sick to obtain cover. One of the many problems of Thailand’s immigration policy is that several government ministries are free to express their views. But they are not singing from the same hymn sheet.

https://www.pattayamail.com/latestnews/ ... ber-401550

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Barry Kenyon wrote:
Fri Jun 17, 2022 6:25 pm
The one-off registration fee is 50,000 baht for all types.
Reasonable.

Barry Kenyon wrote:
Fri Jun 17, 2022 6:25 pm
The LTR retiree option requires a pension of 80,000 baht a year or, if less, a US$250,000 investment in government bonds or public companies. There is compulsory ongoing insurance of US$50,000 and a minimum age of 50.
I presume the 80,000 baht is per month. Since my income is from various sources, not strictly a pension, I'd have to look at the second option. The $250,000 investment in public companies could be quite interesting, assuming one could select companies listed on the Thai stock market. How often this is checked would be a factor, as if one puts in $250k, then it falls in the short term, is one obliged to top up the investment ?

Barry Kenyon wrote:
Fri Jun 17, 2022 6:25 pm
One of the many reasons why the Elite visa got off to a poor start in 2003 was that rumors of holders being able to buy one rai of land or work without a permit proved to be without foundation. The main Elite bonuses appear to be retail discounts and a separate channel at airports and immigration (if you are lucky).
If I remember correctly, the people with Elite visas were not allowed back into Thailand for a period in 2020, when Thai nationals were allowed in. That's not very Elite and is a reminder that we cannot put 100% trust in these schemes.
Or perhaps it is Elite, in the sense that only the rather wealthy can afford to buy a premium visa that isn't always honoured.

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Re: By Barry Kenyon

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Jun wrote:
Fri Jun 17, 2022 7:27 pm
Barry Kenyon wrote:
Fri Jun 17, 2022 6:25 pm
The LTR retiree option requires a pension of 80,000 baht a year
I presume the 80,000 baht is per month.
Maybe, but I think they left out a zero and it is probably 800,000 per year. I'm sure we'll see a correction soon enough.

I don't see the one off fee of 50,000 baht as reasonable. If I continue paying the annual extension fee of 1900 baht, in ten years that's 19,000 baht. This ten year visa would cost 31,000 baht more than that. Where does the "reasonable" part come in?

In any case, I fail to see anything in Mr. Kenyon's article that makes this visa attractive. They would have to offer something truly substantial to stimulate my interest. So far I see nothing.

But I do see something that stimulates my disinterest. Considering the age of many retirees, it isn't so easy to take it for granted that we'll still be alive ten years from now. I don't even take it for granted that I'll still be alive one year from now.

As I said, they would have to offer something truly substantial that would be of serious interest to me. Otherwise, that 31,000 baht stays in my bank account.

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