Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

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#91 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby fountainhall » Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:54 pm

Trump labels the European Union as a foe before mentioning Russia and China.



Last week he also insulted Teresa May in a front page article in the most widely read newspaper in the UK by suggesting that the recently resigned buffoon and pro-Brexiteer Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson would make a great Prime Minister. This is a man who has strong ambitions to take over May's job and is generally regarded as the worst Foreign Secretary in living memory.

News, too, that Steve Bannon is now in the UK helping the pro-Brexit leaders like Johnson. Also, one of Trump's pals John Bolton held a totally secret meeting in London with rabid pro-Brexiteers including Iain Duncan-Smith and Jacob Rees-Mogg. When confronted about it, Duncan-Smith said it was just a meeting between old friends! Believe that if you wish!

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#92 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby Gaybutton » Tue Jul 17, 2018 7:00 am

Finally! I'm glad to see some top Republicans standing up to Trump, at least regarding Helsinki and his love affair with Putin.

I doubt the Republicans will go this far, but I see Helsinki as nothing less than treason.

I thought Trump might ask Putin to extradite the hackers indicted by Mueller. Instead, Trump merely kissed Putin's ass. I wouldn't be surprised if during his private talks with Putin, Trump said, "Listen, Vlad - about interfering with the election and getting me elected - when 2020 rolls around, would you be kind enough to do it again?"

I truly fail to see why the vast majority of Republican Americans just don't seem to see Trump's presidency for what it is and what Trump, himself, is - using Trump's own words, "a complete disaster."

Once again, how would you like to be a history teacher 50 or 100 years from now, trying to explain the Trump administration to your class? How would you like to be a political science teacher trying to explain it to your class now? It would probably be easier trying to explain quantum physics and dark matter.

Hey! I've got a great idea! Since Trump knows more than the entire US intelligence community, to the point he can totally disregard it, why not shut it down entirely? After all, we can certainly rely on Trump's great, flawless, wisdom and insight - and think of all the taxpayer money we would save . . .
___________________________________________________



(CNN) - After President Donald Trump's stunning news conference Monday next to Russian President Vladimir Putin, members of Congress -- including some powerful Republicans -- were quick to rebuke Trump's performance on the world stage and Trump's refusal to call Putin out for interfering in the US election.

House Speaker Paul Ryan contradicted several comments Trump made during his Helsinki news conference, most notably backing the US intelligence community assessment that Russia meddled with the US 2016 presidential election.

"There is no question that Russia interfered in our election and continues attempts to undermine democracy here and around the world," said Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin, in a statement. "That is not just the finding of the American intelligence community but also the House Committee on Intelligence."

Ryan continued, "The president must appreciate that Russia is not our ally. There is no moral equivalence between the United States and Russia, which remains hostile to our most basic values and ideals. The United States must be focused on holding Russia accountable and putting an end to its vile attacks on democracy."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke briefly with reporters Monday, giving his support to the US intelligence community.

"I've said a number of times and I say it again, the Russians are not our friends and I entirely believe the assessment of our intelligence community," the Kentucky Republican said. He did not answer a question on whether he would tell Trump that he disagreed with him.

Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican who has consistently criticized the President, said Trump's comments were "one of the most disgraceful performances by an American president in memory."

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker said the President "made us look like a pushover" and that Putin was probably eating caviar on the plane home.

"I was very disappointed and saddened with the equivalency that he gave between them (the US intelligence agencies) and what Putin was saying," said Corker, a Tennessee Republican who is not seeking re-election.

Trump's comments that appeared to equivocate Putin's denial of Russian election meddling and the US intelligence community's assessment were commonly evoked in the steady stream of criticism. Republican Sen. Ben Sasse, a Republican from Nebraska, issued a blistering statement just minutes after the press conference wrapped.

Sasse rebuked Trump's statement that he held "both countries responsible" for the deteriorated relationship between the United States and Russia.
"This is bizarre and flat-out wrong. The United States is not to blame. America wants a good relationship with the Russian people but Vladimir Putin and his thugs are responsible for Soviet-style aggression," Sasse said in the statement. "When the President plays these moral equivalence games, he gives Putin a propaganda win he desperately needs."

Some Republicans 'deeply troubled' by Trump

Some Republicans in both the House and Senate -- even some typically seen as allies to the President -- said in the hours following the news conference that they were concerned over what they heard Monday.

"The President's summit in Helsinki today should have been an attempt at confronting Russian aggression, hacking, and election interference," Sen. Tim Scott, a South Carolina Republican, said in a tweet. "Russia is not a friend or ally. As Americans, we stand up for our interests and values abroad; but I fear today was a step backwards."

"As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, I am deeply troubled by President Trump's defense of Putin against the intelligence agencies of the U.S. & his suggestion of moral equivalence between the U.S. and Russia. Russia poses a grave threat to our national security," tweeted Rep. Liz Cheney, a Wyoming Republican.

Rep. Trey Gowdy, a South Carolina Republican who was among the Republicans leading last week's sharply partisan hearing of FBI agent Peter Strzok, made clear Monday he did not see Russia as a US ally.

"I am confident former CIA Director and current Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, DNI Dan Coats, Ambassador Nikki Haley, FBI Director Chris Wray, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and others will be able to communicate to the President it is possible to conclude Russia interfered with our election in 2016 without delegitimizing his electoral success," Gowdy said in a statement.

Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins said she sharply disagreed with Trump's comments.

"It's certainly not helpful for the President to express doubt about the conclusions of his own team," Collins told reporters. "He has assembled a first-rate intelligence team handled by Dan Coats and I would hope that he would take their analysis over the predictable denials of President Putin."

Sen. Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina who has had a close working relationship with Trump on issues related to health care and tax reform, tweeted that the summit was a "missed opportunity."

"Missed opportunity by President Trump to firmly hold Russia accountable for 2016 meddling and deliver a strong warning regarding future elections," Graham tweeted. "This answer by President Trump will be seen by Russia as a sign of weakness and create far more problems than it solves."

Graham also warned Trump to leave a soccer ball, a gift from Putin, outside of the White House.

"If it were me, I'd check the soccer ball for listening devices and never allow it in the White House," Graham said.

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, a Republican who has been constant critic, called the President's performance "shameful."

"I never thought I would see the day when our American President would stand on the stage with the Russian President and place blame on the United States for Russian aggression. This is shameful," tweeted Flake, who is not running for re-election.

Rep. Will Hurd, a Texas Republican and former undercover CIA officer, expressed shock at Trump's attitude towards Putin and Russia.

"I've seen the Russian intelligence manipulate many people many people in my career, and I never would have thought the US President would be one of them," Hurd said on CNN's "The Lead with Jake Tapper."

Republicans show support for US intelligence community

Illinois Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger called Trump's comments rebuking the US intelligence community assessment "a disservice," though he did not mention Trump by name.

"The American people deserve the truth, & to disregard the legitimacy of our intelligence officials is a disservice to the men & women who serve this country. It's time to wake up & face reality. #Putin is not our friend; he's an enemy to our freedom," Kinzinger tweeted.

The responses came after Trump declined to endorse the US intelligence community's finding that the Russians interfered in the 2016 US election.
Instead, Trump said Putin was "extremely strong and powerful" in his denial.

"I have confidence in both parties," Trump said of Russia and the US intelligence community.

"I have real confidence in my intelligence people, but I must tell you that President Putin was extremely strong and powerful in his denial," Trump said.

A senior GOP congressional aide told CNN it's "shocking he would disrespect our intel community on foreign soil. Next to Putin."

Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, a key Trump ally, issued a statement backing up the intelligence community, but did not directly criticize the President.

"Russia interfered in the 2016 election," Hatch said in a statement. "Our nation's top intelligence agencies all agree on that point. From the President on down, we must do everything in our power to protect our democracy by securing future elections from foreign influence and interference, regardless of what Vladimir Putin or any other Russian operative says. I trust the good work of our intelligence and law enforcement personnel who have sworn to protect the United States of America from enemies foreign and domestic."

New Jersey Republican Frank LoBiondo, who chairs the House CIA subcommittee, also said Trump missed an opportunity to grill Putin.

"I strongly disagree w/ statement that Russia did not meddle in 2016 election. With all I have seen on House Intel Comm & additional indictments of 12 Russian officers last week, it is clear Russia's intentions. President Trump missed opportunity to hold Putin publicly accountable," tweeted LoBiondo, who is not running for re-election.

Democrats outraged

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Trump "took the word of the KGB over the men and women of the CIA."

He called on Republicans to speak out.

"In the entire history of our country, Americans have never seen a president of the United States support an American adversary the way President Trump has supported President Putin," the New York Democrat said at a news conference.

Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Mark Warner, a Democrat from Virginia, tweeted "for the President to side with Putin over his own intelligence officials and blame the United States for Russia's attack on our democracy is a complete disgrace."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, said Trump embarrassed the US.

"Once again, @realDonaldTrump takes to the international stage to embarrass America, undermine our institutions, weaken our alliances, & embrace a dictator. Russia interfered in our elections & attacked our democracy. Putin must be held accountable -- not rewarded. Disgraceful," Warren tweeted.

Tim Kaine, a Democrat from Virginia, tweeted that someday the US would "turn the page on this dark chapter," but it would not be easy.

"This is a sad, shameful moment for our great nation. We will reclaim our values and reassert our global leadership. We'll turn the page on this dark chapter. But it won't happen on its own. We all must stand up—to side with U.S. law enforcement and to protect all Americans," Kaine said.

Sen. Chris Murphy's mouth was "still agape" by the time of his appearance on CNN's "The Lead with Jake Tapper" -- namely because it seemed to be a "settled fact" by "everyone in the US who knows what's going on" that the Russians had interfered with the 2016 elections, despite Trump statements at the summit.

"The bar was so low for this press conference," the Connecticut Democrat said. "All Trump needed to do was offer some mild pushback against the election interference, say something about the need for Russia to withdraw from eastern Ukraine and Crimea, and he couldn't do any of that."

He added, "America is a whole lot weaker than we were going into this today."

https://us.cnn.com/2018/07/16/politics/ ... index.html

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#93 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby Up2u » Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:23 am

Unbelievable! This says it all.......

John Brennan, the former CIA director and a career intelligence officer, called Trump's comments "nothing short of treasonous."

"Donald Trump's press conference performance in Helsinki rises to & exceeds the threshold of 'high crimes & misdemeanors,'" Brennan tweeted. "It was nothing short of treasonous. Not only were Trump's comments imbecilic, he is wholly in the pocket of Putin. Republican Patriots: Where are you???"

https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/16/politics ... index.html

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#94 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby Gaybutton » Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:12 am

Up2u wrote:Unbelievable! This says it all.......

I disagree. Since the day Trump took office, that only says some of it.

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#95 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby fountainhall » Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:29 am

Foreign policy often moves slowly, with ramifications only visible months or years later: when the US assisted the South Vietnam government in the 1950s, few could see the 58,000 American military dead in the Vietnam war; as the US helped overthrow the democratically elected leader of Iran in 1953, it was difficult to see the 1979 revolution that resulted in a dictatorship that would become America’s main enemy in the Middle East; and too few officials saw that invading Iraq in 2003 would blow up the entire Middle East.

In just the last month, Donald Trump has repeatedly undermined America’s democratic allies and cozied up to autocrats intent on attacking US interests. If current trends continue, today we may be present at the destruction of the geopolitical system that was ushered in after the second world war and secured after the cold war . . .

Straight from the G7 debacle, Trump flew to Singapore for a first-ever meeting between a sitting US president and the leader of North Korea. In the course of his meeting, Trump unilaterally agreed to freeze US-South Korean joint military exercises – a longtime demand of North Korea and China – without consulting the US ally South Korea, and without getting anything in return. This came after a report of Trump trying to withdraw troops from South Korea. While Trump got nothing more from the summit than a photo op with perhaps the world’s most brutal dictator, Trump emulated Kim Jong-un, saying: “He speaks and his people sit up at attention … I want my people to do the same.”

Last week, Trump continued the abdication of American leadership and principles at the Nato summit, saying, “What good is Nato …”, and reportedly threatened to pull the United States out of Nato if other countries don’t spend more on defense. Nato may still exist, but the core of the alliance – the understanding that countries will defend one another when attacked – is missing . . .

Next in Hurricane Trump’s path was the United Kingdom, where Trump was met with massive protests. Trump criticized Theresa May’s approach to Brexit at the same time that her government faces a Brexit crisis. He repeated his frequent, racist claims that immigration is “changing the culture, I think it is a very negative thing for Europe” . . .

Then there’s Trump’s meeting with Vladimir Putin. The Russian president interfered in the 2016 US election to help Trump win – something Trump publicly asked for – about which there is an ongoing federal investigation that has resulted in indictments and guilty pleas. Trump claims that Crimea belongs to Russia, that Russia should be allowed back into the G7, and tries to prevent his own government from imposing sanctions on Russia for the election interference . . . and at the press conference afterwards Trump said he believed Putin’s denial of election interference over the assessment of the US intelligence community . . .

And all of this in just over one month.

From Europe to Asia, Trump is destroying alliances with democracies, while making friends with authoritarian leaders. He sends signals to our allies that they can’t trust America, and that we won’t stand in the way of our adversaries taking what they want. Trump made clear what he thinks when he called the European Union a “foe” this week and Putin a “good competitor”.

If you think it’s just a few diplomatic flaps, think again. The results of this slippery slope could be a much more violent, darker world – brought to you by the G3.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... ery-slope-

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#96 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby Gaybutton » Tue Jul 17, 2018 2:42 pm

Mr. President, this time you made a BIG mistake.

When will Congress and the American people say enough is enough?

How much longer will the USA allow an obvious madman to occupy the White House?

Republicans, when will you wake up to the fact that the longer you continue to support Trump, the more you damage your own party? It's some kind of insanity with Trump virtually every day. Not sometimes. Not once in a while. It's EVERY day.

You want the Republican party to be "great again"? I'll tell you how. Impeach Trump, convict him, and get him the hell out of the White House.
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Only 2 years, 3 months, and 16 days until the next presidential election. How much more Trump will Congress allow until then?

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#97 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby fountainhall » Tue Jul 17, 2018 2:49 pm

Nuff said!

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#98 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby Captain Kirk » Wed Jul 18, 2018 2:45 am

I see Trump is now using the Hillary Clinton defence - "I misspoke". Classic.

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#99 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby Gaybutton » Wed Jul 18, 2018 8:53 am

Captain Kirk wrote:I see Trump is now using the Hillary Clinton defence

Notice that no matter what it is, everything is always somebody else's fault. And I mean always. If he ever once took the blame for anything, I missed it.

I can't help but see the similarity, along with other similarities, between Trump and a certain German who also blamed everything on everyone except himself, was convinced he knew better than everyone else, and would get rid of anyone working with him who was not a yes man.

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#100 Re: Consequences of Trump's Win - 5

Postby fountainhall » Wed Jul 18, 2018 10:43 am

EU and Japan sign biggest Free Trade Deal

As Trump draws in the strings of protectionism, the EU and Japan have just signed a monster agreement on free trade between the countries. The 2nd and 4th largest of the world's economies control approx. one third of world trade.

[EU leader Donald Tusk] said "We are putting in place the largest bilateral trade deal ever. This is an act of enormous strategic importance for the rules-based international order, at a time when some are questioning this order” . . .

Once ratified by parliaments on both sides, the EU-Japan trade deal will eliminate about 99% of tariffs on Japanese goods, including on cars, from the eighth year after the deal is implemented, with tariffs scrapped on car parts immediately.

Japanese consumers will enjoy lower prices for European wines, pork, handbags and pharmaceuticals, should it come into force in 2019, as is expected. The two parties also signed an agreement to allow data to flow between the EU and Japan, creating “the world’s largest area of safe data flows”.

Tusk said Japan and the EU were firm in their support of the Iran nuclear deal, the joint comprehensive plan of action, which lifted economic sanctions on Iran in return for curbs on Tehran’s nuclear expansion. Trump reneged on the deal earlier this year.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/ ... tectionism


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