What happened to North Korea?

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#131 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby fountainhall » Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:01 pm

China will never do it. They certainly don't want to take over the North and be seen as invaders.

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#132 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby Gaybutton » Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:32 pm

fountainhall wrote:They certainly don't want to take over the North and be seen as invaders.

Tell that to Tibet and the Dalai Lama . . .

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#133 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby fountainhall » Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:51 pm

That's the obvious example to cite - but it is a totally wrong analogy. The Tibetan Empire collapsed in 842 followed by 400 years when there was no central rule whatever. The Mongols then invaded Tibet whereafter the country became part of the Mongol Empire. The Mongols then conquered China and established the Yuan Dynasty. Tibet became past of that Dynasty. The Yuan did not last long, but when the Manchu Mongols reinvaded and established the Qing Dynasty in 1644, they supported the Tibetans and then reincorporated Tibet into their Chinese Dynasty. It was to remain so for the remainder of the Qing Empire. When the British invaded in 1903-4, the Qing re-asserted their authority and fought them off.

So for centuries Tibet was unquestionably part of China. The Korean Peninsula has never been part of China. Part of the North was at one time annexed as part of China's Tang Dynasty but that ceased more than a millennium ago.

Those are the facts. That does not mean I approve of China's actions in Tibet's recent history and I believe that the Hong Kong and Macao "one country, two systems" should at least be tried in Tibet, as the Dalai Lama has suggested and said he would approve. The Mongols may have invaded Tibet when the country was in chaos. But that has happened in many countries around the world and it in no way affects the sovereignty of the Chinese. If you take that argument much further, then much of Europe, for example, is in the wrong hands!

Every nation in the world recognises Tibet as part of China. No country recognises any part of North Korea as part of China.

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#134 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby Gaybutton » Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:13 pm

I appreciate the history lesson, but that's beside the point. The point is whether China would be worried about being seen as invaders. I believe that's the last thing China would worry about, if they worry about it at all.

But I agree that I can't imagine why China would even want North Korea - even if it's handed to them on a silver platter. A conquered North Korea has nothing to offer, at least nothing I know of. It would be much more trouble, along with much more expensive, than it's worth.

As far as China is concerned, I believe for them North Korea has become more a thorn-in-the-side (or perhaps more accurately, pain-in-the-ass) than anything else.

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#135 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby fountainhall » Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:37 am

I wholly agree about the thorn-in-the-side/pain-in-the-ass suggestion. If it were not a buffer between South Korea and American influence, China would quite like North Korea to disappear.

Interesting idea came up on the Sunday morning news programmes yesterday - that the North remains more or less as it is with curbs on its weapons programme and China be invited to join the countries patrolling the DMZ. That would be one way of ensuring the North would never consider launching its missiles aimed at the South. Would China agree? No idea, but worth exploring.

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#136 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby Gaybutton » Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:37 am

fountainhall wrote: Would China agree? No idea, but worth exploring.

Something more I would like to see China do would be to change their policy when North Koreans manage to escape into China. Presently, when they're caught, China just sends them back despite knowing what will happen to them. If China is not willing to take them in, it would be nice if at least alternatives could be arranged, rather then sending them back, although China is not exactly known for humane treatment of prisoners.

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#137 Re: What happened to North Korea?

Postby Gaybutton » Sat Oct 14, 2017 4:42 am

Malaysia halts all imports from North Korea, data shows

by Reuters

13 Oct 2017

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia, which until recently had been one of Pyongyang's closest friends, has halted all imports from North Korea, as part of global efforts to cut off funding over its nuclear and missile programmes.

Malaysia did not buy any goods from North Korea in June and July, after buying 20.6 million ringgit ($4.89 million) worth of goods in the first five months of the year, according to data from the Department of Statistics.

Malaysia's ties with North Korea have deteriorated since the February assassination of Kim Jong Un's estranged half brother at Kuala Lumpur international airport, which the United States and South Korea say was ordered by the North Korean leader.

Kuala Lumpur last month banned its citizens from travelling to North Korea, two weeks after Prime Minister Najib Razak met with US President Donald Trump at the White House. The visit gave Mr Najib a political boost at home, with his popularity suffering over a massive scandal at a state investment fund, which the US Department of Justice is investigating.

Mr Trump told reporters after meeting with Mr Najib at the White House last month that Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak "does not do business with North Korea any longer, and we find that to be very important."

Malaysia had been a key source of revenue for the North. Citizens from both countries enjoyed visa-free travel. Malaysia was host to hundreds of overseas workers. More importantly were operations that funnelled money to the regime. Reuters reported earlier this year North Korea's spy agency, the Reconnaissance Bureau, was running an arms operation out of Kuala Lumpur.

DRASTIC SANCTIONS

Malaysia's halt to North Korean imports came ahead of drastic UN and US sanctions last month that ramp up export bans and penalise companies and individuals doing business with North Korea.

The United Nations on Sept 11 banned North Korea's lucrative textile exports as well as all joint ventures with North Koran individuals or entities.

Trump issued an executive order 10 days later penalising any company or person doing business with North Korea by cutting off their access to the US financial system, freezing their assets or both.

Other Southeast Asian nations have similarly reduced imports from North Korea. The Philippines said last month it has suspended trade with North Korea to comply with sanctions.

Thailand's imports from North Korea dropped to $400,000 between January and August, compared with $1.8 million in the same period last year, according to data from the commerce ministry.

Indonesia, on the other hand, increased its imports from North Korea to $1.8 million in January-July before the latest round of sanctions, versus $910,000 in the same period last year.

Secretary of state Rex Tillerson, on a swing through Southeast Asia in August, urged countries to do more to cut funding streams for North Korea.

For instance, North Korean front companies were using Bangkok as a regional hub, changing their names frequently, Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Susan Thornton told reporters during Mr Tillerson's visit to Bangkok in early August.

Malaysia's past imports from North Korea ranged from big ticket items such as coal, medical devices and light emitting diodes to even crabs, noodles, cloth hangers and fire extinguishers.

A US government official told Reuters Malaysia has assured the United States it does not import from Pyongyang anymore.

Malaysia's trade ministry did not respond to requests for comment.

Malaysia had been one of the few countries increasing its imports from North Korea in recent years - from a mere 1,183 ringgit ($311) in 2012 to 8.2 million ringgit in 2016.

An unusual purchase this year was coal, which Malaysia bought right after China, the top buyer of the North's minerals banned imports of the commodity in February. A UN report in September said North Korea had diversified its coal exports to other countries after the China ban.

Malaysia bought $3.4 million worth of coal in March and $16.6 million worth of coal tar products, data showed. The March purchase was the first time Malaysia had bought coal from North Korea since at least 2012.

While imports have stopped, Malaysia has continued exports to North Korea. Exports included palm oil, food and medical supplies worth 4.4 million ringgit between January and July.

https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/world/ ... data-shows


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