Taipei in 48 hours

Anything and everything about gay life anywhere in the world, especially Asia, other than Thailand.
fountainhall
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#31 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby fountainhall » Thu Mar 02, 2017 1:23 pm

readerc54 wrote:
fountainhall wrote:The biggest card China can play in the meantime is economic. Taiwan has become a popular and quick getaway for a growing number of Chinese. I recall there was a small dip last year after China pulled the plug on flight frequency when the new Taiwan president took office but haven't heard any more about it since.

The other issue is Taiwanese investment in mainland China. This stood at US$133.7 billion between 1991 and 2013. Two years ago the Economist estimated there are presently 88,000 Taiwan companies operating in China employing 15.6 million mainland Chinese. Alongside the more strained relations under the new Taiwan President, the annual investment has - like tourism - been reduced, but still stood at $9,18 billion last year. However, rising wages in China are thought to be another reason for the decline as operating factories in China becomes too expensive to compete with countries like Cambodia and Vietnam.

In my last three visits to Taipei it has been obvious that hotel rates are falling, thanks in part to the reduction in mainland tourists. The same is true in Hong Kong where Beijing has started turning the screws on tourism until the young democrats accept that it will not budge of the terms of the Joint Declaration on Hong Kong's future and the Basic Law, both jointly negotiated by the British the Chinese. In both territories, Beijing has the upper hand, no matter what others think.

readerc54
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#32 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby readerc54 » Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:30 pm

fountainhall wrote:Two years ago the Economist estimated there are presently 88,000 Taiwan companies operating in China employing 15.6 million mainland Chinese..... Beijing has the upper hand, no matter what others think.


It certainly seems so. I suppose China could choose to nationalize those Taiwanese companies if they wished since they really are Chinese companies, as viewed from Beijing at least. But even if they do, China's superior position in the matter by any measure (legal, historical, logistical) will be sufficient to discourage US military intervention.

You've succeeded in whetting the appetite for some readers (I hope to be among them) to make their first journey to Taiwan and they will, I'm sure, be heartened to learn that hotel rates are well in hand thanks to mainland policies.

fedssocr
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#33 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby fedssocr » Sat Mar 04, 2017 7:30 am

Given how much the current generation of young people consider themselves Taiwanese and not Chinese, it would be extremely difficult for Beijing to take over. They will not go willingly.

fountainhall
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#34 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby fountainhall » Sat Mar 04, 2017 9:27 am

I completely agree. And with every young Taiwanese having to spend some time in military service, there's no doubt some would take up arms. But that does not alter the fact that left on their own, of the two 'countries', mainland China could not fail to win. The 'African American' in the woodpile is what the international community - especially the USA - would do. Slap on a few sanctions as has been done with Ukraine and Crimea?

I don't believe Beijing will ever go that far. It can exercise control over Taiwan in far more subtle ways should it so desires.

aussie
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#35 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby aussie » Sat Mar 04, 2017 1:55 pm

It is interesting that retired Taiwanese generals often go to Beijing for meetings as discussed in the article below. My Taiwanese friends want nothing to do with joining China. All Chinese on the mainland i have met consider Taiwan is China. When i visited Shanghai last year i dated a retired (at 25yo) Chinese army pilot. From our initial chats it was clear not to discuss Taiwan with him. He just said because of his army service he is never allowed to go to Taiwan. I hope China leaves Taiwan as it is but i must say that it worries me very much lately.

On a brighter note the Airport MRT has finally opened connecting Taoyuan Airport and Taipei.

From Focus Taiwan

Taipei, March 3 (CNA) Premier Lin Chuan (林全) said Friday that retired military generals and political appointees should be subject to regulation even after they have left public office, but he added that such regulation would not be unreasonable or target any specific individuals.

The premier said that both retired military generals and political appointees are high-profile figures in society and their deeds and words must not compromise the national interest.

He made the remarks one day after the Cabinet decided to revise the Act Governing Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area to ban political appointees and senior military officers from travelling to China for a minimum of three years after retiring.

When asked during a legislative question-and-answer session if the proposed law amendment could restrict personal freedom, Lin said the Cabinet will not restrict freedom of speech or personal liberty, but he added that military generals and political appointees, even once they have left office, are still high-profile, and should be subject to regulations.

The Cabinet's proposed ban would apply to political appointees; military officers at the rank of lieutenant-general and higher in the Army and Air Force, and vice admiral and higher in the Navy; officials involved in highly confidential work; and intelligence officers.

While in China, the retired officials would not be allowed to take part in activities attended by China's top leaders or behave in a way that adversely impacts the dignity of Taiwan, including bowing to China's national flag and singing China's national anthem.

Political appointees and senior military officers violating the rule could have their pensions slashed by 30 percent to 100 percent, while those who receive a one-time retirement payment could be fined between NT$500,000 and NT$3 million.

Calls for the government to amend the law were made after dozens of retired Taiwanese generals attended a gathering organized by the Chinese government in Beijing on Nov. 11 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Republic of China founding father Sun Yat-sen (孫逸仙).

The ex-generals were reported to have stood up for the playing of the national anthem of the People's Republic of China. They then listened to a speech by Chinese President and General Secretary of the Communist Party of China Xi Jinping (習近平).

(By Wen Kui-hsiang and Lilian Wu)

fountainhall
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#36 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby fountainhall » Sat Mar 04, 2017 2:25 pm

aussie wrote:My Taiwanese friends want nothing to do with joining China.

My friends feel exactly the same - and they generally range in age from early 20s to mid-40s. On the other hand, amongst them there is no major desire for a total break from the mainland. The present rather uncertain status quo seems acceptable provided Beijing does not start its old sabre-rattling.

pong
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#37 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby pong » Fri Mar 10, 2017 9:08 am

Mainland Chinese-or at least a sizeable minority of them-which is already bigger as the total of Taiwan, will always-just like most Thai balk/parrot what their govmt or yesterdaily newspprs tell them. or instantly start to enrage whatever other country is currently on the list of to be harrassed-like the SouthKoreans with their US-sponsored weapon shield against the Northern brothers.
My esteem of the Chinese after some 6 visits spread out over the yrs diminish every time and even more with those throngs of wei-wie shouters in their sweaty faces here in the must=-see visitor places in BKK.
And funny-if they had such a longing for reading uncensored news, why are they never seen in uncensored internetshops like where I sit now in BKK? Plenty of them visit here and stay.

fountainhall
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#38 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby fountainhall » Fri Mar 10, 2017 7:02 pm

pong wrote:funny-if they had such a longing for reading uncensored news, why are they never seen in uncensored internetshops like where I sit now in BKK? Plenty of them visit here and stay.

Funny? Surely you're out of date! Almost every Chinese I have seen on many visits to China in recent years and whenever I see them here in BKK has a mobile phone. I cannot believe that Chinese censorship extends to Thailand. So I expect they can access blocked Chinese sites here just as I am able to access several sites blocked in Thailand when I am in China! I'm sure the tour guides make sure there are stops at shops selling SIM cards.

fountainhall
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#39 Re: Taipei in 48 hours

Postby fountainhall » Sat Jul 15, 2017 1:37 pm

Note

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