Not So Friendly Thailand

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fountainhall
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#31 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby fountainhall » Thu Apr 05, 2018 11:19 am

thaiworthy wrote:I have an example of the exception. I have straight friends who were born and raised in the US, but have Thai parents. They moved back to Thailand with their families, raising children of their own, and do not share these so-called "general characteristics." Their children adopt the characteristics of the family. The same may be true for other Thais born from other countries.

I must again - respectfully - disagree for the simple reason that the analogy is surely flawed. If you are born and raised in a country with very different values, in an education system that places emphases on very different attributes to those in your parents’ country of birth - and additionally you are exposed totally to US society, it is inevitable that, at such an impressionable time of your life, you as an individual will absorb those great differences and, with rare exception, become far more American than Thai. These new values will equally inevitably be passed on to your children, even though they may become tempered with time.

I have seen this in a Thai who was educated in England from the age of 6 and then at the Parsons School of Design in New York. He is Thai, he looks Thai, he acts like a Thai when appropriate, but to all intents and purposes he is British! Similarly with Chinese, Japanese and Koreans whom I have known well, their exposure almost from birth to American or British society, education and values renders them vastly less Chinese, Japanese and Korean than if they had been brought up in their home countries. At least, that is my experience.

The fact is that only a tiny percentage of Thais are born and/or are fully educated overseas.

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Gaybutton
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#32 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby Gaybutton » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:35 pm

fountainhall wrote:only a tiny percentage of Thais are born and/or are fully educated overseas.

I don't know if it works this way everywhere, but if a person is born in the USA, even if his parents are foreign, then he is automatically a USA citizen. At least it works that way for now. That may change if Trump gets his way.

My question is if a Thai is born in the USA and is automatically a USA citizen, can he also hold dual citizenship as a Thai?

Another thought: I wonder how it affects a dual citizenship Thai boy when it comes to military conscription.

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#33 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby bobsaigon3 » Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:32 pm

http://www.multiplecitizenship.com/wscl ... ILAND.html

DUAL CITIZENSHIP: NOT RECOGNIZED [BY THAILAND]. Exceptions:
Child born abroad to Thai parents, who obtains the citizenship of the foreign country of birth, may retain dual citizenship until reaching the age of majority (18). At this point, person must choose which citizenship to retain.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
So, if the child chooses Thai citizenship at age 18, he would presumably to subject to conscription in Thailand. His American citizenship would remain in force, since America does recognize dual citizenship.

Even if the child serves in the Thai military, he could retain his American citizenship unless there is evidence that he intended to relinquish it:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel ... rvice.html

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Gaybutton
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#34 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby Gaybutton » Fri Apr 06, 2018 9:04 am

Sometimes Thai logic makes perfect sense. During my first trip to Thailand, in Bangkok I went on a guided tour of the important Buddhist temples. At each of them there were multi-language signs, along with the tour guide's strict reminders, that you must remove your shoes before entering.

I asked the tour guide to explain the reason for removing shoes. I was expecting to get a lecture about the religious significance of removing shoes.

That was not quite the response I got. His explanation of the reason for removing shoes: "Keep floor clean."

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#35 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby fountainhall » Fri Apr 06, 2018 9:30 am

Gaybutton wrote:His explanation of the reason for removing shoes: "Keep floor clean."

In Asia I think this is an understandable response. I recall on my first visit to japan being surprised at having to take off my shoes when I visited a friend's home. Then I started to think about the filth that must have accumulated on the soles of those shoes pounding pavements, walking through muddy paths etc. Quickly I adopted the same practice and insist on those visiting my home taking off their footwear. I wish those living in other countries would also adopt it. I'm actually appalled when I see people enter homes with their dirty outdoor shoes spreading goodness knows what on nice carpets.

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windwalker
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#36 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby windwalker » Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:17 am

There is an advantage to taking one's shoe off; the soles of my feet or socks become quite dirty by walking around the house without shoes. Thus I am a walking mop.

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thaiworthy
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#37 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby thaiworthy » Sat Apr 07, 2018 10:21 am

Another good "general characteristic" which I am especially grateful for, is Youth's respect for Elders. Although this is probably found in most Asian cultures.
"Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things." --George Carlin

fountainhall
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#38 Re: Not So Friendly Thailand

Postby fountainhall » Sat Apr 07, 2018 11:00 am

thaiworthy makes a good point. Indeed, where would all of us older codgers be without the attentions lavished on us by such lovely young Thais?

Seriously, though, it is a very timely issue given that greater China has just celebrated the annual Ching Ming Festival only two days ago. We tend to call this the Grave-Sweeping Festival where entire families make a pilgrimage to the graves of deceased loved ones and even ancestors long since dead. The graves are tended, flowers placed, joss sticks burned, prayers intoned. Often small offerings of food, tea or wine are left behind for the departed to ‘enjoy’ as the living repair to restaurants and cafes to celebrate with their extended families.

Family tradition including respect for elders is very much an Asian rather than just a Thai tradition. Along with that respect is the obligation still placed on younger family members to look after their parents as they age. Perhaps in general this may now be slightly stronger among Thais, for the Cultural Revolution in China all but destroyed family life and its traditions. Whilst they are now making a resurgence, it is nowhere near as universal as before.


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